tax policy center

Advanced Search

by Topic:

by Author:

by Type:

by Date Range:
  From last wks

     

E-mail Newsletter

Enter your e-mail address to receive periodic updates on TPC publications and events.

> newsletter archive

Library
 

Publications By Author

Author: Nunns, Jim

1-10 of 31     Back to Authors Next>>


Financial Transaction Taxes: An Overview (Policy Briefs)
Leonard E. BurmanWilliam G. GaleSarah GaultBryan KimJim NunnsSteven Rosenthal

The massive financial market failures that led to the Great Recession have prompted renewed calls for a financial transaction tax (FTT) to discourage excessive risk taking and recoup the costs of the crisis. A well-designed FTT could raise up to about 0.4 percent of GDP ($75 billion in 2017) in the United States and would be quite progressive. We discuss design options and the effects of an FTT on various aspects of financial sector behavior and its ambiguous effects on economic efficiency.

Published: 01/20/16
Availability:   PDF


Taxation of Dependents Under the Income Tax (Article/Tax Facts)
Jim Nunns

This Tax Fact explores the taxation of dependents under the income tax.

Published: 01/04/16
Availability:   PDF


An Analysis of Donald Trump's Tax Plan (Research Report)
Leonard E. BurmanJim NunnsJeff RohalyJoseph Rosenberg

This paper analyzes presidential candidate Donald Trump’s tax proposal. His plan would significantly reduce marginal tax rates on individuals and businesses, increase standard deduction amounts to nearly four times current levels, and curtail many tax expenditures. His proposal would cut taxes at all income levels, although the largest benefits, in dollar and percentage terms, would go to the highest-income households. The plan would reduce federal revenues by $9.5 trillion over its first decade before accounting for added interest costs or considering macroeconomic feedback effects. The plan would improve incentives to work, save, and invest. However, unless it is accompanied by very large spending cuts, it could increase the national debt by nearly 80 percent of gross domestic product by 2036, offsetting some or all of the incentive effects of the tax cuts.

Published: 12/22/15
Availability:   PDF


An Analysis of Governor Bush's Tax Plan (Research Report)
Leonard E. BurmanWilliam G. GaleJohn IselinJim NunnsJeff RohalyJoseph RosenbergRoberton Williams

This paper analyzes presidential candidate Jeb Bush’s tax proposal. It would reduce individual and business marginal tax rates, curtail tax expenditures, and convert the corporate income tax into a cash-flow consumption tax. The proposal would cut taxes at all income levels, reducing federal revenues by $6.8 trillion over its first decade before considering macro feedbacks. The plan would improve incentives to work, save, and invest, but unless accompanied by very large spending cuts, it could increase the national debt by as much as 50 percent of GDP by 2036, which would tend to put a drag on the economy.

Published: 12/08/15
Availability:   PDF


Why Individual Income Tax Revenues Grow Faster Than GDP (Research Brief)
Jim NunnsJeff Rohaly

Using the latest long-term budget projections from the Congressional Budget Office, we project that individual income tax revenues under current law will increase as a share of GDP from a little over 9.5 percent in 2025 to a little less than 13.3 percent in 2090, an increase of over 3.7 percentage points. This paper describes the factors that explain this differential in growth rates and provides estimates from the Tax Policy Center’s new long-run microsimulation model of the relative importance of each of these factors over the 2025-2090 period. We find that 80 percent of the increase in revenues as a share of GDP occurs because current law does not adjust some individual income tax parameters for inflation and none of the parameters for changes in real income.

Published: 09/01/15
Availability:   PDF


Financial Transaction Taxes in Theory and Practice (Occasional Paper)
Leonard E. BurmanWilliam G. GaleSarah GaultBryan KimJim NunnsSteven Rosenthal

In response to the financial market crisis and Great Recession, there has been a resurgence of interest in financial transaction taxes (FTTs) around the world. We estimate that a well-designed FTT could raise about $50 billion per year in the United States and would be quite progressive. We discuss the effects of an FTT on various dimensions of financial sector behavior and its ambiguous effects on economic efficiency.

Published: 06/30/15
Availability:   PDF


Design Changes to the SOI Public Use File (PUF) (Research Report)
Victoria BryantJohn L. CzajkaJim NunnsGeorgia Ivsin

The Statistics of Income (SOI) Division of IRS prepares a publicly available file, the Public Use File, from its annual sample of income tax returns. The PUF is a critical data source for tax policy analysis. To insure taxpayer confidentiality, SOI applies disclosure avoidance procedures to the PUF. In 2012, SOI established a Working Group to perform an in-depth review of these procedures and of the analytical usefulness of the PUF. This paper describes the revised PUF design recommended by the Working Group, and how the design changes improve both disclosure avoidance and the PUF’s analytical usefulness.

Published: 12/18/14
Availability:   PDF


Description and Analysis of the Camp Tax Reform Plan (Research Report)
Jim NunnsAmanda EngLydia Austin

This paper describes the major provisions in the “Tax Reform Act of 2014,” the comprehensive tax reform plan released on February 26, 2014, by Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-MI). It also presents the Tax Policy Center’s analysis of the plan’s revenue impact beyond the 10-year budget period, distribution of the tax burden, economic incentives, and compliance costs.

Published: 07/08/14
Availability:   PDF


Costly Error in Payroll Tax Computation for the Self-Employed (Article/Tax Notes Viewpoints)
Jim Nunns

Errors in the formulas for computing payroll tax for the self-employed result in their paying less payroll taxes than workers with the same earnings. All self-employed workers benefit from these errors, but those with high earnings benefit disproportionately. A provision in Ways and Means Committee chair Dave Camp’s tax reform proposal would correct the formulas. The $5 billion revenue gain over ten years from enacting this provision could help pay for extending expiring tax provisions or for better targeted tax cuts. And it would eliminate a glaring inequity. This article explains the correct formulas and the effects of applying them.

Published: 07/01/14
Availability:   PDF


Analysis of Specific Tax Provisions in President Obama's FY2015 Budget (Research Report)
Elaine MaagJim NunnsEric ToderRoberton Williams

This document reviews several notable tax proposals in President Obama’s fiscal year 2015 Budget. These include expanding the earned income tax credit (EITC) for workers without qualifying children, expanding the child and dependent care tax credit for families with young children, conforming rules for self-employment contributions act (SECA) taxes for professional service businesses, and changing business taxes to create a reserve to fund long-run revenue-neutral business tax reform.

Published: 06/30/14
Availability:   PDF

1-10 of 31     Back to Authors Next>>