Tax Policy Center

tax Notes

Business Taxes: TaxVox
Yesterday was quite a day for corporate tax geeks. We saw a corporate tax inversion that comes with a long, Baroque history; an estimate by Reed College economist Kim Clausing that inversions and other income-shifting techniques reduced Treasury revenues by as much as $111 billion in 2012; and a
January 25, 2016Howard Gleckman
Business Taxes: TaxVox
While we wait to see how and when the Obama Administration will use its executive authority to curb the use of corporate tax inversions, the debate continues over whether Treasury even has the power to limit the practice. In a new article in Tax Notes , Tax Policy Center senior fellow Steve
September 22, 2014Howard Gleckman
Individual Taxes: TaxVox
Corporate inversions have been the topic of the summer for tax wonks (beats jellyfish and beach traffic, I suppose), but the issue is a classic bit of Washington misdirection. Instead of focusing on the real disease—an increasingly dysfunctional corporate income tax—we are obsessing over a symptom—
August 26, 2014Howard Gleckman
Individual Taxes: TaxVox
Nice piece by Tax Notes reporter Lindsey McPherson describing the recent history of the tax extenders. Four take-aways: There is always last-minute drama over bringing them back, most are repeatedly extended, they are almost never paid for, and they are frequently rolled into a bigger bill. In 2004
July 16, 2014Howard Gleckman
Individual Taxes: TaxVox
Nothing gets lawmakers and pundits more outraged than government’s proverbial waste, fraud, and abuse. Nearly always, these stories involve spending. But taxes are hardly immune. One case of pure waste involves a simple math mistake that will cost the Treasury $5 billion in lost revenue over the
July 1, 2014Howard Gleckman
Individual Taxes: TaxVox
For a decade, Congress has been debating how to tax managers of private equity firms. The argument is pretty familiar to tax wonks: Should these partners treat this compensation (commonly called carried interest) as capital gains, as they do today? Or should they be taxed at the higher ordinary
June 25, 2013Howard Gleckman
Individual Taxes: TaxVox
It is the unfounded rumor that never dies: You will have to pay a 3.8 percent federal health care tax on the sale of your house. For all but a handful of taxpayers, this is not true. It is wrong. It is urban myth. It is the revenue equivalent of death panels or the Halliburton conspiracy to start
April 2, 2012Howard Gleckman