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Topic:   Corporate, Business Taxation

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How Much Do Taxes Affect Startup Investment Incentives? (Commentary)
Donald MarronJoseph Rosenberg

In a contribution to the Policy Dialogue on Entrepreneurship blog of Kauffman.org. Joseph Rosenberg and Donald Marron examine how tax policy affects investment incentives for startup companies. Startups often make losses, and thus cannot make immediate use of the R&D tax credit, accelerated depreciation, and other tax benefits. The value of those benefits declines the longer startups have to wait to use them. This puts startups and fast-growing young firms at a disadvantage relative to established companies.

Published: 03/18/15
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Composition of Income Reported on Tax Returns in 2012 (Article/Tax Facts)
Lydia AustinRoberton Williams

As income increases, the composition of income changes substantially. For most taxpayers, salaries and wages contribute the most. But higher-earners typically report income from capital gains and businesses.

Published: 03/02/15
Availability:   PDF


Tax Policy and Investment by Startups and Innovative Firms (Research Report)
Joseph RosenbergDonald Marron

Our tax system imposes widely varying tax rates on investments in different activities, favors debt over equity, and favors pass-throughs over corporations. Targeted tax incentives can lower the cost of capital for small businesses, startups, and those that invest in intellectual property. But those advantages are weakened, and sometimes eliminated, because businesses that invest in new ideas rely more on higher-taxed equity than do firms that focus on tangible investment and because startups are often limited in their ability to use tax deductions and credits. These limits can more than offset the benefit from tax incentives.

Published: 02/09/15
Availability:   PDF


Distributional Effects of the President's New Tax Proposals (Research Report)
Leonard E. BurmanNgan Phung

The White House announced a package of tax proposals as part of what President Obama called “Middle Class Economics” in the State of the Union Address. This paper summarizes and discusses TPC’s distributional estimates, focusing on the distribution of all income tax cuts, the major tax cut provisions, and the largest tax increase provisions including the new fee on financial institutions. The tax cuts primarily benefit low-income single workers and working age households with children. The income tax increases primarily affect those with very high incomes and those with a substantial amount of capital assets.

Published: 01/30/15
Availability:   PDF


Lessons the United States Can Learn From Other Countries' Territorial Systems for Taxing Income of Multinational Corporations (Research Report)
Rosanne AltshulerStephen ShayEric Toder

The United States has a worldwide system that taxes the dividends its resident multinational corporations receive from their foreign affiliates, while most other countries have territorial systems that exempt these dividends. This report examines the experience of four countries – two with long-standing territorial systems and two that have recently eliminated taxation of repatriated dividends. We find that the reasons for maintaining or introducing dividend exemption systems varied greatly among them and do not necessarily apply to the United States. Moreover, classification of tax systems as worldwide or territorial does not adequately capture differences in how countries tax foreign-source income.

Published: 01/21/15
Availability:   PDF | Order this title online at Hopkins Fulfillment Services


Changes in Income Reported on Federal Tax Returns (Article/Tax Facts)
Roberton WilliamsLydia Austin

The composition of reported income has changed markedly since 1952. Investment income has continued to grow, along with business income, interrupted only by periodic economic downturns. Meanwhile, salaries and wages have declined as a share of income.

Published: 01/07/15
Availability:   PDF


Professor Shay Got It Right: Treasury Can Slow Inversions (Article/Tax Notes Viewpoints)
Steven Rosenthal

In a recent Tax Notes article, Shay argued that Treasury could write regulations to reduce the tax incentives for U.S. corporations to expatriate. Rosenthal agrees with Shay and analyzes the legal support for regulations under section 385.

Published: 09/30/14
Availability:   PDF


Flow-Through Business Income as a Share of AGI (Article/Tax Facts)
Joseph Rosenberg

This Tax Fact documents the increasing share of flow-through business income as a percentage of adjusted gross income (AGI) reported on individual income tax returns. In 2012, net income from sole proprietorships, partnerships, and S corporations totaled nearly $840 billion and accounted for more than 9 percent of total AGI.

Published: 09/29/14
Availability:   PDF


Corporate Inversions (Research Report)
Kimberly A. Clausing

Recently, there has been a spate of corporate inversions, where U.S. multinational corporations have combined with foreign companies, arranging their corporate structure to locate the residence of the resulting corporation in a foreign country with an attractive corporate tax climate. This paper will discuss both the longstanding features of the U.S. tax system that provide incentives for corporate inversions and the reasons for the present surge in inversions. If unfettered, corporate inversions are likely to undermine the U.S. tax base, so swift policy action is likely warranted. Inversions can be effectively addressed in a targeted fashion.

Published: 08/20/14
Availability: HTML | PDF


Corporate Tax is Broken and Needs Major Surgery (Commentary)
Eric ToderAlan Viard

In a contribution to the Wall Street Journal’s MarketWatch Inc., Eric Toder and Alan Viard argue that recent highly publicized tax avoidance transactions by U.S. corporations reflect basic flaws in how we tax the income of multinational corporations, and that proposed reforms that maintain current definitions of corporate residence and source won’t fix the underlying problems. They propose two fundamental structural reforms – seeking international agreement on rules for allocating the income of multinational corporations among countries, or scrapping the U.S. corporate income tax entirely and replacing it with taxation at ordinary income rates of dividends and accrued gains of U.S. resident shareholders.

Published: 08/06/14
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1-10 of 95     Back to Topics Next>>