Tax Policy Center

Experts

Expert

William G. Gale

Codirector

Social Media

Research report

In its fiscal year 2004 budget, the Bush administration proposes to create a new set of tax-preferred accounts that would expand opportunities and consolidate rules for tax-advantaged saving. The initial reaction to the proposal was not particularly positive. Despite its uncertain prospects, the...

March 3, 2003
Leonard E. Burman, William G. Gale, Peter Orszag
Research report

The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act (EGTRRA) of 2001 back-loaded many of its provisions. For example, EGTRRA reduces the top income tax rate from 38.6 percent currently to 37.6 percent in 2004 and 35 percent in 2006. The future income tax cuts scheduled under EGTRRA have...

February 17, 2003
William G. Gale, Matthew Hall, Peter Orszag
Research report

The release of the Congressional Budget Office's new baseline budget projections on January 29, 2003 offers the opportunity to reassess the fiscal status of the federal government as Congress and the administration consider a new set of budget proposals. This article examines the current budget...

February 10, 2003
William G. Gale, Peter Orszag
Research report

The effect of fiscal policy on economic growth is a controversial and long-standing topic in economic theory, empirical research, and economic policymaking. It is at the heart of the policy debate surrounding the sharp increases in official federal budget surpluses in the 1990s, the equally...

February 3, 2003
William G. Gale, Peter Orszag
Research report

On January 7, 2003, President Bush proposed a new package of tax cuts, consisting primarily of a new tax cut for dividends and capital gains on corporate stock and an acceleration of most but not all of the provisions of the 2001 tax cut that were scheduled to take effect in future years.1 In...

January 27, 2003
William G. Gale, Peter Orszag
Research report

[ Brookings Institution] President Bush's new tax plan is an answer in search of a question. It would provide little short-term stimulus. It seems unlikely to provide much of a long-term boost to growth or jobs. It is an incomplete way to reform corporate taxes. It would not boost investor...

January 8, 2003
William G. Gale
Research report

Recent policy discussions have raised the possibility of payroll tax cuts or income tax credits based on payroll tax payments. In 2003, workers and employers each owe 6.2 percent Social Security tax on the first $87,000 of a worker's earnings, and a 1.45 percent Medicare tax on all wages....

January 6, 2003
William G. Gale
Brief

[Newsday] Currently affecting only a few, mostly wealthy, taxpayers, the alternative minimum tax (AMT) will expand dramatically over the next several years, visiting high tax rates and mind-numbingly complex paperwork on unsuspecting middle-class families. Prompt action could reverse...

November 14, 2002
Leonard E. Burman, William G. Gale
Research report

The United States is often said to maintain a classical tax system, under which corporate profits are subject to double taxation, once at the corporate level when they are earned, and again at the individual level when they are paid out as dividends. The Bush administration is reportedly...

November 11, 2002
William G. Gale

From TaxVox

RSS